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Wednesday, September 2

Writers. Should. NOT. Tell. Other. Writers. What. Tense. Or. POV. To. Use. It's. NOT. Your. Choice.


Before I get into my IWSG post, I have another book release coming up fast. FROZEN CRIMES is coming out this month on the 30th! And I'll be doing another blog hop. :D

(I know, I know. I just asked for sign-ups for the Keep Writing with Fey blog hop. I hope everyone enjoyed that one and will want to have even more fun with this one. I won't be doing book blasts, just this blog hop and 10 guest posts.)

PRE-ORDER LINKS: Amazon / Barnes & Noble / iTunes


Frozen Crimes Blog Hop Prompt: Whom would you want to be stuck with during a blizzard, and what would you do? 

(Family members and spouses don’t count. Have fun with the question. Think silly. Actors, singers, celebrities, your favorite author, etc. Feel free to pick an entire TV show or movie cast. Your answer doesn’t have to be long, but keep it PG. lol)

Blog Hop Date: September 30, 2020 (Wednesday)

NOTE: All posts will include info for Frozen Crimes (including an excerpt), a huge giveaway, and an exclusive free eBook. I'm going all out on this one! I'll email everything a couple of weeks before. 


Sign Up:


THANK YOU! 



The Insecure Writer's Support Group is a safe place for insecure writers of all kinds.


(Not related to this month's question at all.)

A writer (who I'll refer to as Writer) felt it was their duty to convince a friend (who I'll refer to as Friend) to change all their manuscripts from present tense to past tense, because Writer thought present tense was wrong. In response, Friend said it's the author's choice.

I 1000% agreed, and I agree 2000% now.

Writers. 👏 Should. 👏 NOT. 👏 Tell. 👏 Other. 👏 Writers. 👏 What. 👏 Tense. 👏 Or. 👏 POV.  👏 To. 👏 Use. 👏 

Unless you're the writer's editor/agent/publisher, it is none of your business and not your decision.

Days later, after I explained to Writer that present tense is not wrong and it is the author's choice, Writer returned to tell me they'd convinced Friend to change ALL their manuscripts from present tense to past tense.

*bangs my head against my desk*

I cannot express enough how wrong that is.

Many books are written in present tense, especially if it's first person. There's absolutely nothing wrong with it, and I feel awful for Friend who was told to change it until they caved. That never should've happened.

Do you want to write in present tense? Write in present tense.

Do you prefer past tense? Write in past tense (but don't claim present tense is wrong).

Do you want to write in first person? Write in first person.

Do you want to write in third person? Go ahead (but don't claim first person is wrong).

Heck, you want to attempt second person? More power to you! I'd love to read what you come up with. If another writer says it won't work, ignore them.

It is your book. It is your choice.

Period.

No...EXCLAMATION POINT!

*mike drop*


QUESTION: Has another writer (who was not your editor or publisher) told you to do something their way and claim your way was wrong? Vent about it in the comment section. I'm here for you.


Please note this post isn't about critiquing and offering suggestions or pointing things out or asking questions. Those are all fine things to do. :) I didn't even know the IWSG question this month.

105 comments:

  1. Considering what you are working on right now, I had to giggle a little at this. BUT, you ARE the editor. Big difference.

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    Replies
    1. The difference is also that I was told it's omniscient. I just pointed out it's not. I'm not changing the POV or tense. :)

      Delete
  2. I have 5 names on my list of beta-readers. You are on the list. Happy IWSG, Chrys.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It took me a minute to realize you were commenting your answer for the IWSG Day question: If you could choose one author, living or dead, to be your beta partner, who would it be and why?

      I had no idea what the question was this month. Oops!

      Thank you! I'm honored to be on your list. :)

      Delete
  3. Congratulations on Frozen Crimes. I did recently listen to Tsunami Crimes--it's not my normal genre but you kept my attention drew me in. I'll skip on being a blog hop host as I am going to be in the middle of moving at that time. My life is about to change big time (see my post in thepulpitandthepen.com: "Heading to the Mountains"

    www.thepulpitandthepen.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for listening to Tsunami Crimes! I'm glad that although it's not your usual genre that it kept your attention. :)

      Delete
  4. When I first got published (decades ago!) I thought it was my duty to 'school' other writers on the 'right' way to do things. Since that grave error, I've learned that the 'right' way is the writer's way! Congrats on the new release, Chrys!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. The writer's way is the right way. :) Even with critiques. Writers take in the critiques and can figure out if those suggestions and notes, etc, make sense. If they don't, the writer doesn't have to take them (and shouldn't be forced to).

      Thank you, Gideon!

      Delete
  5. But...MY way the the RIGHT way! How will everyone know this if I don't TELL them?

    And yeah. Lots of people have told me my way of doing things is wrong. Gonna keep doing them my way anyway, though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL!

      It can really hurt a writer to be told they're doing things wrong, especially if it's things like this (tense, POV) where it's all a matter of opinion, and one isn't wrong or better than the other.

      Yes. Never stop doing things your way. Enormous books and all. :)

      Delete
  6. I had one critique partner tell me I'd written a story completely wrong. Since the other three liked it the way it was, I ignored the advice.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Completely wrong? Gosh. That's harsh. I'm glad you ignored that advice. Comments like that can really damage a writer, too. Think what would've happened to a new writer who had only given their book to that one person? *sigh*

      Delete
  7. My latest book is "Going no where at present due to circumstances,
    Always a pleasure to read your post Chrys,
    Take care and safe.

    Yvonne.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's understandable. I haven't written on my fiction book since May.

      Take care, Yvonne!

      Delete
  8. I don't like how present tense sounds, but I wouldn't insist it was wrong or stop reading a book because it was written in it. And I've had some people when beta reading for me try to insist I needed to change the tense.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Tense is definitely something that's all a matter of preference. None of them are wrong. I'm used to past tense. I can't write in present tense at all, and I have tried.

      Delete
  9. IMO the only true rule of writing is - do what works.
    As for advice like that, the way I look at it is you're entitled to your opinion, and I'm entitled to ignore it :)

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    1. Yes! lol I love that. When it comes to inexperienced writers, though (like Friend), opinions like that can be damaging. Friend didn't know he could ignore Writer's "advice." Friend tried in the beginning, saying it's the writer's choice, but caved, and that's sad.

      Delete
  10. It drives me nuts when I read comments and forums where people are asking stuff like what tense they should write in, how long should their chapters be, how many characters should they have, etc. They're obviously a novice writer, but everyone has a different answer and and all of them are correct. You can and should write whatever you want, ESPECIALLY if you're a novice writer. You haven't found your voice, your audience, anything. Let it develop and you can fine-tune as you go.

    But yeah, there's no "wrong" way to do it. There are opinions and tastes, but writing, like any art, has a VAST variety of styles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well said!

      Yes, it is the novice writers who ask those questions, and getting feedback that is anything but "do what you want" can really set them on the wrong path. I've seen many writers ask about chapter length. I always say, chapters are however long you feel they should be. It's the same with any of those other questions.

      Delete
  11. I'm with you 1000%, too. I have been told certain tenses go with certain age divisions and genres, and I think, in context, it can be a fun, general conversation (without pointing fingers at anyone's work). Otherwise, no one should tell someone else what to do, unless it is an editor or a publisher who has a stake in it, somehow. Again, collaborative, or professional work/help is one thing, just sticking an oar into someone else's pond for no reason is just wrong.
    I just had two people go off on my last week about faith and science fiction - from two different directions. One person didn't think I should have faith in my science fiction because she thinks theological discussions should be left out of fiction all together. Another person felt I should forsake science fiction and get back to the "right" side of faith. I let their words get to me for about 36 hours longer than I should have. I realized I have heard those arguments before, I've prayed over them, I've thought over them, and the end result is: I write faith-based fiction sometimes, I write science fiction sometimes. Sometimes the two intertwine, sometimes they don't. And, who says they can't? Or I can't? People who are so narrow-minded in one viewpoint or another (anti or pro-faith) that they can't imagine anything different. I don't want to listen to people like that. Anyway, long rant. Over. Whew.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. "just sticking an oar into someone else's pond for no reason is just wrong." That made me laugh. Yes, let's not do that.

      Whaaaat? I've edited (for DLP) a lot of science-fiction that have faith in them as a driving force. Get back to the "right side of faith." Huh? Wow. I am glad you're sticking to your gut. Definitely don't listen to people like that. They're not the readers you're writing for. Write science fiction when it moves you. Write faith-based fiction when you're called to. Intertwine them whenever you wish. There's nothing wrong with that. Keep doing what you're doing, Tyrean. <3

      Delete
  12. It's my story and I'll write it the way it sounds right to me. What the characters tell me.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. YESSS!!! We should definitely listen to our characters. <3

      Delete
  13. I'm lucky not to have had that experience. My critique partners suggest things but never insist that they know the only right way. We all have to follow what we think is best while listening to other's suggestions.

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    1. Critique partner suggestions are wonderful. And, yes, all writers need to follow their gut when they get suggestions from critique partners.

      Delete
  14. Well said! I would tell you I don't like novels in present tense and then I would have to admit there are bundles of them I love. That's my show-don't-tell way of saying you're right.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm lucky I haven't had that experience. When I give my feedback to my critique partner I avoid being rude, rather I prefer to give helpful suggestions instead of being overbearing.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Not being rude is key. Critique partners should definitely point tings out and offer suggestions. In this situation, Writer wasn't even Friend's critique partner.

      Delete
  16. I read your title and immediately cracked a smile. Pretentious writing know-it-alls really get under my skin. I've learned to cut connections with them pretty quick, but it's taken years for me to get to the point where I know when to stick to my guns and when to heed the words of others.

    ReplyDelete
  17. You've been busy with all the writing! Good job!

    Everybody has an opinion. Sometimes I wish they'd keep their opinions to themselves.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Writing from last year. This year? It's been touch and go.

      Delete
  18. Someone in my writing group tried to suggest I make one book alternating POV characters and first-person, which I quickly shut down. I said I hate that trend, and that my natural voice is third-person omniscient. It's extremely, extremely rare I write an entire book in first-person. Some people have a knack for creating original, no two the same first-person narrators, but I've always gravitated towards third-person.

    When I still did querying/get noticed by an agent contests, I saw an agent saying a hist-fic "feels like it wants to be in first-person." Why? Because it was present tense, and third-person present isn't something she was familiar with. As I've said many times, it was like a revelation when I read Ida Vos's Hide and Seek at age twelve. I'd no idea prior books could be present tense, and it inspired me to use present tense when I began my first Russian historical a short time later. Of course, that was years before it was a huge trend.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Always stick with your natural voice. Mine is third person, past tense. :)

      Delete
  19. I've written in 1st person, 3rd person, past and present tense. I never set out to use one or the other, the story and characters seem to decide as I start to write. In my opinion, all are acceptable and we have the flexibility to choose what works for us and our stories. Best wishes, Chrys.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I agree that are all acceptable and we have the right to choose whichever POV or tense we want to use for every story we write. :)

      Delete
  20. This falls into my ever growing category of "most writing advice sucks." It also sounds like said Writer falls into the category of frenemy rather than friend. Because seriously, unless this Writer's name is Margaret Atwood, Stephen King, or James Patterson, move along, nothing to see. What I especially hate about this tactic is that it is a passive-aggressive way of abusing the friend's insecurity by deliberately diminishing the person's creativity, rather than offering actual helpful advice.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I feel for Friend so much. Writer actually debated it with Friend to get Friend to change their mind, and I only hope Writer backed off after I replied to say that Friend should not have been convinced to change their manuscripts from present tense to past tense just because of Writer's preference. *sigh*

      Delete
  21. I am part of a writers group and was asked to comment on the opening chapter. This chapter was filled with a specific racial term. I called attention to this fact. The author flew into a fury because he thought I called him a racist. Apparently, he is a member of this racial group and felt entitled to use the word. He withheld this vital piece of information so his writing appeared to be insensitive. Should I have not drawn attention to the term?
    Lynn La Vita blog: Writers Supporting Writers

    ReplyDelete
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    1. I think you should have and you certainly can in the future. I would've said something. At least to say I wasn't comfortable with it. He could've reacted in a better way. Flying into a fury is never good.

      Please note this post isn't about critiquing and offering suggestions or pointing things out or asking questions. Those are all fine things to do. :)

      Delete
    2. Thank you for your opinion. This situation has been haunting me. You have a lot more experience than me. I apologize for asking an off topic question.

      Delete
    3. No need to apologize. I just wanted to make sure my post wasn't being confused with helpful critique partners. You didn't do anything wrong when you pointed out that racial term. So many would've have, especially now. Don't fret about it anymore. <3

      Delete
    4. Thanks Chrys.
      I appreciate you explaining and reassuring.

      Back on topic, I think in present tense and write in past tense. I write in past tense because when I was starting out, a respected editor said that was preferred. As a result, my stories are often a mix of both. I may write my next post in present tense...gasp!
      Excellent topic. Thank you for your patience and this topic.

      Delete
  22. They did and after struggling with it, I put the story away. Eventually dug it out again, but it was such a mess I gave up. It didn't look like my story anymore. Two year out of my writing life--gone.

    Anna from elements of emaginette

    ReplyDelete
  23. The leaders of a critique group I no longer belong to (Gee, I wonder why?) tried to convince me that readers HATE 1st person narration. These two were frustrated writing teacher wannabes who swallowed King's On Writing as holy gospel and tried to convince me, a romance writer, that I needed to meet the expectations of their readers, military sci-fi fans.

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    1. Yikes. I'm glad you're not a part of that group anymore. First person may not be to everyone's taste, but to try to convince or force other writers not to use it, when it is one of the most popular forms of narration, is beyond me.

      Delete
  24. I'd never presume to tell any writer how to write. That's not a beta reader's job. Their job is to find the positives and suggest how to enhance the story when possible. Suggestions are just that. Everyone has to find his or her way to tell the story they want.

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    1. This wasn't even coming from a beta reader. And, yes, "suggestion" is the key word. Even being an editor, I make a lot of suggestions and explain them, but I don't browbeat writers to take them. I understand it's up to the writer.

      Delete
  25. Completely agree on author's choice of tense. Not to mention first person brings more immediacy.

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  26. I agree about tense, and any other thing having to do with a writer's own work. We should always do what we want with our own work. Whatever feels right.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Ah, writers vs editors. I see what you did there ;-) Our themes mesh more than I expected, and you bring up an excellent point: While editors weed out mistakes, prop up sagging plot lines or dialogue, and beta readers gauge story-strength and likability, writers should stick to writing - their own stories. It's what they do best.
    Compelling post, Chrys! And a great way to start a conversation ;-)

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    1. I'm glad you found this compelling. :) Thanks for signing up for my blog hop!

      Delete
  28. Sigh. Why are there some people who need to "fix" the world?

    ReplyDelete
  29. When I wrote short stories, I tried both ways of telling it-- present tense and past. Usually, you can tell the difference in your tone and voice and character's dialogue, and decide which is best. For novels, I'm stuck in past tense for some reason. Nice post. Please stop banging your head or you'll hurt yourself. :)

    ReplyDelete
  30. A lot of writers I've been in critique situations with have very strong opinions. Some of them forget that those are still just opinions. Anytime someone offers me all-or-nothing ultimatum type analysis? I stop listening, because they're obviously limited in their views. @samanthabwriter from
    Balancing Act

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    1. Stop listening is a smart tactic. It can take a bit to learn to do that, though. But I agree that so many are obviously limited by their views.

      Delete
  31. Yikes. Just yikes. I will say that there's rarely an instance where switching back and forth between present and past tense works out. And that a series generally sticks to the same tense for all the books. But beyond that... wow.
    And Grammarly will tell you to keep in present tense, depending on the editing selections you pick.
    But yeah. The author has to decide what they like.
    What was that "friend" offering in trade for all that changing? Is the friend the head of BIG 5 publishing company and cutting a six-figure advance? Lay out a huge marketing campaign? Rolling out a read carpet like Author is already Stephen King or some such book-money-best-selling person? Because if Friend isn't offering $ale$ - dollar dollar bills, yo - Friend needs to stuff it.

    Can I be frozen with a main character from my book? He'd be great in that situation. (Urban fantasy joke here. Like if I said Jack Frost or Elsa.)

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Red carpet.
      Red.
      And whoops, I switched the identities of friend and writer around. Still, you get my drift.

      Delete
    2. I totally got your drift.

      And, yes, yes, yes! You can choose your main character from your book for the blog hop. I'd love to get to know him. (Unless you're joking back participating. lol)

      Delete
  32. I agree with you too! It sounds like the Writer is a narcissist. SO sad how Friend listened and changed all of the MSs over that! :(

    I hope both Writer and Friend see this blog post. Muahahaha!

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    1. It is sad. So unfortunate now that instead of listening to their voice, their creativity that wants to write in present tense, they will be forcing themselves to write in past tense. That force could really mess them up.

      Delete
  33. Write what sounds best for your story. I have a novel in first person/present and a series in past tense/third. Phew. That person had a hide to tell someone that. Trouble is, we're mostly so insecure about our writing that we take too much notice of critiquers to the point we no longer recognize our story. :-( Good luck with your next launch!

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    Replies
    1. We can listen to critiquers too much, and not the ones who give constructive criticism, but the ones who force their opinions on writers.

      Thank you!

      Delete
  34. You're absolutely right. It's your story, so the choices of tenses, POVs and so on are yours. Unfortunately, some critics don't really offer constructive criticism. Instead, they suggest the changes they would have made if they wrote your story themselves.
    I suppose that Writer is one of those folks. He would've written the Friend's story in the past tense, so he said the present tense was wrong. And the poor Friend is so insecure, she believed the Writer's dictum. Argh!

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    Replies
    1. I believe you are right. Writer prefers past tense and thinks present tense is wrong no matter what. It's very unfortunate.

      Delete
  35. Congrats on the upcoming release!

    So true. The writer should write the story as they see it. As the story unfolds for them. Any changes like tense, POV, etc is deeply personal decision. And like you said changes to a writer's work should come from their editor/agent/publisher.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Congrats on your next book!

    I'm a present tense/first person writer, on the whole. Sometimes it changes, depending on the story. And I do see a lot of comments (in FB groups, not directed at me) that it's wrong, and ONLY past tense/3rd person is correct.

    I'm working on a 2nd person POV at the moment, that'll mess with their heads :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you!

      I truly don't get why so many writers think present tense and/or first person is wrong. They're not.

      Oh my gosh. I am so in love with the idea that you're writing in second person!

      Delete
  37. Congratulations on Frozen Crimes! Go you! You're so right! It's up to the writer how they want their book to be written. Good for you for letting that be known.

    Click link below for my new domain. Warmly,
    Elsie

    ReplyDelete
  38. Hi Chrys - I hear you ... and you've explained it well. I had someone ask me why I write my posts like I do ... she came from a more formal part of life ... I've no idea how my posts came about - just my voice ... and it seems to go down ok with friends here! Exactly - it's our choice ... take care and stay cool!!! All the best with the two books ... Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How you use ellipses may not be the norm, but it is so you and it's your style. I love it.

      Delete
  39. I signed up for the blog hop. Should be a fun topic to write for my blog post that day!

    Indeed, it is up to the writer what tense to use. Sheesh. When I first began writing fiction, I used present tense as it felt more natural. I then changed to past perfect which has become an easy habit to learn. An editor once told me that 'action', 'thriller' novels work well in present tense. Sigh. There is so much to consider and I think you're right, Chrys.This should be up to the author and the advice of a good editor.

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    1. Thank you so much for signing up for my blog hop!

      When I first started writing, I wrote in first person (I'd have to look back to see if it was present tense or not...I was a kid), and then, when I got older and rewrote those books, I started writing in third person. That has stuck. Now, I can't write in first person very well. I try. Every project I attempt to do that way fails, though.

      Every writer and what works for them is different.

      I have no problem with thrills in past tense. *shrugs*

      Delete
    2. Whoops. And that should say "thrillers," but at least you got what I meant. ;)

      Delete
  40. Congrats on the upcoming release! I'll do a shout-out but I know I'll forget the hop (I have a terrible time remembering I signed up for those—crazy, I know.)

    As to tenses: that's totally up to the writer and their tale. I prefer past but have seen present well done, too. Actually, the man I'm co-authoring with prefers first-present and I'm a third-past fan. It was amazing for me to see that when he tries to write in my favorite, his writing is 'off', but when he does it in his favorite form, it's like a whole new writer and amazing. I never would have guessed that tenses are so writer dependent.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Teresa! I always send email reminders with the date and the info, if that helps. :)

      That's a perfect example of how forcing yourself to write in tense/POV that you don't usually use can be difficult and create results that aren't your best. Thanks for sharing that!

      Delete
  41. Hi, Chrys! I like to write in different tenses and POVs to flex my writing muscle, and I agree that there's no right tense. Congratulations on another new release for you--you're on fire!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's great. Flexing that writing muscle is important.

      Thank you!

      Delete
  42. Hi, Chrys! I'm still making the rounds! I write in whatever tense and POV fits the piece. And I absolutely agree with what you said! 👏👏👏 I'm happy to help with your blog hop. I won't be able to read your book first, because I am majorly backed up with books, but I will read it. I have a lot of experience with blizzards. Who would I pick? Jamie Fraser from the Outlander series. He has a lot of success at surviving in difficult situations, and he's cute, entertaining, and a gentleman.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Oh spam! The other night I suddenly "saw" the spam button on my blog. I clicked on it and discovered 1000+ hits. I spent over an hour deleting what was likely 1500 spam comments. I feel your frustration! LOL

      Delete
    2. Ha! I love your pick. Very smart. Thank you for signing up for my blog hop!

      Isn't spam just the worst? Grrr.

      Delete
  43. I love the question for your blog hop! Definitely a sock fight with the X-Men - past and present. :)

    It makes me so sad that Writer pestered their friend like that. I was so lucky that I had no one telling me what to do when I started writing. I did whatever wanted, dual first person, multiple 3rd person, single third person, past, present, a mix of both with flashbacks. It was so much fun getting to experiment. That shouldn't be taken away from anyone. It's how we discover what we like best, or maybe even that we don't have a preference and change it up from story to story. I couldn't agree with your sentiment more. No one should EVER tell someone else how to write their story.

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    1. A sock fight with the X-Men. Ha! Too funny.

      Great points about experimenting and how all writers should be free to do that and to discover what they like for their own writing. :)

      Delete
  44. There is a book written in second person that I love: This is the Water by Yannick Murphy.

    I wouldn't argue about tense with an author, but I would not love head-hopping within a chapter. Just my opinion.

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    1. I'll have to check out that book.

      Well, head-hopping is different. That comes about when an author doesn't stay in a character's POV. Most likely, they're not aware of it. (I used to struggled with this.) Whether you're writing in first person or third person, you don't want to head hop. Any head-hopping I find when I edit, I point out that it has to be rewritten into the correct character's POV or removed. The only author who gets away with it is Nora Roberts. lol

      Delete
  45. I completely agree! I have seen some amazing things done by moving away from the ordinary and trying something different with POV and tense. I feel bad for Friend, also. Writer is not on my list of Beta readers. lol. Happy IWSG Wednesday (on Thurdsay).

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  46. I used to have people tell me all the time that I should do this or shouldn't do that. The ones that are still in my life know that I'm going to do whatever I want regardless of what they say. The others are no longer in my life.

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    1. That's exactly how it should be. Good for you!

      Delete
  47. Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I'm not sure how the blog hop on the 30th works. Is that something you have to be invited to in order to participate?

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    1. Not a dumb question at all. Nope. If you scroll up to the form where other participants are linked/listed, click the blue link that says "click here to enter." it's very small and a little hard to notice. Then you fill in your blog URL, name, etc, and submit the info. Then, before the 30th, I will send you an email reminder with a document that you can easily copy and paste into a blog post. You'll have to add your answer to the question, of course. The question is: Whom would you want to be stuck with during a blizzard, and what would you do?

      Th document I'll send even shows you where you can fill in your answer. :)

      Easy-peasy. And if you have questions, you can always ask me in an email.

      Delete
  48. I’m signed up, Chrys. Thanks for the offer to help promote your new release. Oooo, stuck with someone during a blizzard who is not my husband or children? Wow, that's a tough one.

    As for someone telling you you are writing your story wrong, either in tense, character, place, or plot: I agree with others here. If the person is definitely a successful author, editor, or publisher, then seriously consider it. Otherwise, consider the comment ONLY IF many readers mention it. This is YOUR story. Make it what YOU want. All best to you.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Sorry for my late visit. Thank you for stopping by my blog.
    I'm sorry I missed the sign-up for your hop. I would have loved to help out and participate with that.
    I don't believe I've ever had anyone try to dictate my tense or POV, but apparently using italics to show internal monolog is a sign of poor skill.

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  50. Oh, that sounds like a fun blog hop! Kait Nolan had a great romance about two people stuck in a cabin during a blizzard...

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  51. I agree that tense, and all other aspects of the story should be the writer’s decision. I also agree that all input should be regarded as “ friendly suggestions.” Congratulations on your new release, Chrys! Sorry, but an exclamation mark was clearly, or is clearly needed here.

    Julie

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