Monday, January 21

Interview with Bill Nevitt, Audiobook Narrator for the Disaster Crimes Series


I am really excited to welcome Bill Nevitt to Write with Fey. Bill is the audiobook narrator of Seismic Crimes, Tsunami Crimes, and the-soon-to-be-released Flaming Crimes! His answers are fascinating and gives a neat perspective into the work of narrators.

Welcome, Bill!

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1. What equipment do you use and what’s your process from audition to finished product?

My equipment consists of a “Lexicon Omega” computer interface, Rode NT-1000 condenser mic and an Apple “iMac Pro” computer, 25” monitor.

Following the narration, I listen to the entire chapter, completing three steps:
A) ”Proofing” – confirming my narration matches the text of the book;
B) Editing – Confirming/adjusting the timing of the read, i.e. appropriate pauses, etc.
C) Mastering – noise reduction and volume adjustments to meet ACX’s standards


2. When you narrated Seismic Crimes, I’d only worked with one other narrator for Hurricane Crimes, who did voice Beth in a womanly tone. In the beginning, it would make me laugh until I got used to it, so I’m curious…how do you create the voices for female characters?

All of my characters, both male and female, have been derived from people that I’ve either known well, grew up with, was a school classmate with or former coworkers.  Inspiration for character voices can also come from people that are public figures, athletes, “shady”/criminal types, or, people that are just plain “quirky characters;” this can be people I’ve encountered at social events, ball games, etc. I never know what the origin or source of my next character will be.  




3. What genres do you enjoy narrating the most?

Although each genre has its appeal, I’d have to say any form of Fiction appeals to me the most, as those stories allow me to create voices to match the author’s description of the characters that comprise the story. That’s why it’s so helpful for Fiction authors to provide as much background information about the characters as possible, so I can create voices for those characters that sound like “the voice of the character the author heard in his/her head” when he/she wrote the book.


4. There are a few steamy scenes in nearly every installment of the Disaster Crimes Series (except for the shorter works). How do you feel about narrating steamy romantic scenes?

I believe the key to narrating romantic passages, as well as any other dramatic pieces, is to give the listener “the gist” of the scene and let the listener’s imagination take over from there. The listener’s imagination, in many ways, can provide “more steam” to the scene than the narrator can create, as all listeners have their own concept of what is seductive or erotic. An excellent example of the use of imagination was in the movie “Jaws,” as viewers did not see the shark until well over sixty minutes into the movie; the viewer’s fear was heightened by the viewer’s own imagination, not the visual.  I try to achieve that level of involvement for the listener in all my Fiction narrations.




5. What caught your attention with Seismic Crimes that had you auditioning for it, especially considering it was Book Two of the series?

In reviewing the audition information, the concept of the book intrigued me. To that point, I had not narrated a Romance title and believed that the story was one that would be compelling for the listener, if I provided a solid performance.


6. So far, which of the Disaster Crimes books (Seismic Crimes, Tsunami Crimes, Flaming Crimes) have you enjoyed narrating the most and why?

Seismic Crimes, as that was the book was where I was first introduced to the characters, as I did not narrate the initial installment of the series, “Hurricane Crimes.”  


7. Do you have a favorite character and/or moment from the Disaster Crimes Series?

I would have to say the villains in the books, such as David Buckland (Buck) and Jackson Storm. “Sinister types” that required unique voices.


From Bill Nevitt's YouTube. Take a listen to a sample of Flaming Crimes before its release:




8. I have fun writing the villains, too. How did you become an audiobook narrator?

I had established myself as a voice actor and on camera talent several years ago.  A colleague of mine suggested that I investigate audiobook narration; I tried it and really “took to it.” Audiobook narration gives me the opportunity to “act” with my voice, as well as read many interesting books!


9. If you could narrate any book in the world, what would it be?

As a History “buff,” I’d really like to narrate any of Stephen Ambrose’s works. His writing was very compelling. It’s a shame he passed away at a relatively young age.


10. That is a shame. What are the other audiobooks you’ve narrated?

“Flaming Crimes,” once completed, will be my 30th audiobook narration. 

Rather than list them all, I’ll offer a breakdown by genre:  History – 6; Mystery – 6; Historical Fiction – 1; Romance – 5; Sports – 2; Sci-Fi - 1; Young Adult – 1; Spiritual – 1; Business – 7.


Anyone interested in reviewing any of my titles can do so via Audible, Amazon, iTunes, You Tube (Bill Nevitt) or my website: www.billnevittmedia.com.

YouTube – Bill Nevitt





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Wow! I had no idea you’ve done so many audiobooks. Lucky #30, perhaps? Haha! Thank you for your hard work and dedication, and thank you for participating in this interview.


Everyone, I encourage you to check out Bill Nevitt’s work, and please leave him a comment below. Thanks!


45 comments:

  1. Great interview, Chrys. Very much goes into an audiobook as Bill has explained. Sounds like you do quite a variety of books, Bill. Congrats on your success in the audio book genre! And Chry, congrats to you on getting your books into audio format!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Lisa! Bill is talented and so easy to work with. He goes above and beyond. :)

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    2. Thank you, Lisa. I've been intending to respond with "proper ID" vs. "Unknown." As stated before, I'm glad you found it informative. Yes, I enjoy narrating all genres, as each has its own appeal!

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  2. Creating audiobooks sounds like an enjoyable career, but it must be a little rough on the voice after a while. When I give a speech or presentation, I have to drink a lot of water to keep my "pipes" lubricated. Bill, do you keep your recording sessions short to protect your voice?

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    1. That's funny that you said that, because I gave my first presentation a couple of weekends ago. I practiced quite a bit, and my throat really started hurting from that. I was worried that I wouldn't make it through the actual presentation. Luckily, I did.

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    2. Hi Susan: My apologies for the late response.
      As I was beginning my book narration career, I was completing a ten year "stint" of my "first career" working in a telephone call center for a major US insurance company. I was on the phone, non-stop (other than 2 - 15 minute breaks and a 30 minute lunch break per day) from 9 AM-5 PM.
      I operate, pretty much, on the "let's see how it goes today" format. There are some days when I'll narrate all day long. Three long days like that and then I'll need a break. I "feel your pain!" Ha!

      Agree; lots of ROOM TEMPERATURE water while recording (cold water is bad for "the pipes"), proper diet and rest, as well.

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  3. This was a wonderful interview Chrys, I don't possess any audio books but after reading your post thought perhaps I will.
    Hope all is well with you.

    Yvonne.

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    1. Audiobooks are pretty neat and very popular. :)

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    2. Well, Yvonne, I just happen to know of a guy who narrates books! Ha! Go to Audible.com and enter my name in the "search" field and you can review the complete listing of all my narration projects. As stated in one of my responses, I've narrated books involving many different genres. Maybe there will be something there for you!

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  4. A good audio book is always fun to listen to. I love them. It draws you into the story and you get caught up with the characters.

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    1. Listening to my audiobooks was my first experience with it, but it is pretty neat. :)

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    2. Hi Spacer Guy: you hit the nail right on the head! My goal is to "draw in" the listener so they believe they are involved in the story, not being in the other room "overhearing the conversation!'

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  5. Narrating is definitely a skill. 30 books is a lot. Considering how many people love audiobooks, it's probably a growing field.

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    1. It is a growing field, and now is a great time to it in on it as an author. As a reader, too. :)

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    2. Hi Liz, Yes, the audiobook field is growing exponentially. More good content out there every day!

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  6. Bad guys must be fun indeed. But yeah, after reading many books must get rough on the voice.

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    1. Voicing bad guys would be my favorite part, too.

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    2. Hi Pat - Yes, one of my prior projects involved a "sleazy" character which required a "gravel-ee" voice. After voicing that part, I needed a break and ran for the "tea with honey." I felt like someone sandpapered my throat!

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  7. Very, very cool! I love the analogy to the Jaws movie - silence and absence (via voice or visual) are SO powerful!!

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    1. Absolutely. A good pause (silence) can add so much tension.

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    2. Agreed! That movie still gives me "the creeps!"

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  8. How awesome! Giving a story a voice is a great talent to have.

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    1. Thanks, Elizabeth. I try to visualize that I'm reading to someone else in the room; keep it simple!

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  9. Fascinating interview. I'm learning to enjoy audio books. Have only listened to a few, but hope to hear more.

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    1. Audiobooks can take some time to get used to, but they are pretty neat.

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    2. Hi Bev - thanks for your interest! Lots of interesting content available now!

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  10. Interesting interview! I've never really thought about the voice narration too much, and it's such an intriguing endeavor.

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    1. Upon working with Bill, I really started to think about it, what went in to it, how it works, etc. :)

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    2. Hello Tonja - once I discovered book narration, I was hooked!

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  11. Great interview and interesting to see inside the process as I listen to a lot of audiobooks in the gym. However, I liked listening to you when you did a audio story. Sometimes the author can get things right. I love listening to Rick Bragg read his own work.

    www.thepulpitandthepen.com

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    1. Do you mean my little readings I post to YouTube? I do enjoy doing those. :)

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    2. Hello Sage: Yes, there are many authors who do double-duty as narrators. Quite a bit of work!

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  12. Wonderful interview and congrats on the audiobook.
    sherry @ fundinmental

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  13. I really enjoyed the interview, Chrys! Thanks for your process, Bill. I found it very interesting how an audio book is recorded. I just finished a memoir and we plan to do an audio book so now that I know the process, it doesn't sound to complex.

    ALL the best Chrys and Bill with #30!

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    1. I'm glad that this interview gave you some insight for the memoir audiobook you plan. Good luck with it! And thanks! ;)

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    2. Thanks, Michael and good luck on your project!

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  14. This was such a great interview. My oldest listens to audio books vs. reading them. He has a long commute and it helps pass the time while sitting in traffic. It's good to have insight into how the reading is done. Fantastic!

    Elsie

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    1. I'm glad you enjoyed this interview and that your oldest son enjoys audiobooks. :)

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    2. Thank you, Elsie. Agree, a great way to pass the time in traffic, but, hope your son keeps hi eyes on the road!

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  15. Great interview! Thanks for sharing:)

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